What Are The Best Addiction Recovery Books?

20 Aug

Although 1:1 work and support are the ideal ways to beat addiction, books on addiction recovery have their place, too. If you are confused about where to start with recovery, need some identification, or just need a few helpful reminders about how to make your recovery even stronger, addiction books can fulfil that need.

One of my books,The Recovery Formula: An Addict’s Guide to getting Clean and Sober Forever has just been awarded five stars out of five by Reader’s Favorite, so other people obviously agree that books on addiction recovery can be very valuable.

I know that on my own journey, one particular book sparked so much hope, identification, and some real practical lessons on how to start recovering, that I really credit it for motivating me to make the decision to reach out for help when I was really struggling to stay sober on my own. That book was No Room to Live: A Journey from Addiction to Recovery by My favourite addiction recovery bookWynford Ellis Owen, which I know hardly anyone has heard of.

But that book personally inspired me so much that I actually typed out an email to thank the author for writing it when I was in the middle of alcohol withdrawal (Yes, my keyboard was covered in sweat and and the email had many typos!). And when I had recovered and decided to write my first book, The Recovery Formula, I sent my book to him to see what he thought. Luckily, he loved it, and even gave me a review for the back cover.

This shows just how powerful connecting with others’ experiences and wisdom can be in recovery, and the place of books in enabling us to give and gain hope, motivation, and sometimes even help save someone’s life.

I also love that there are books which are really specific to certain addictions. For example, if you suffer from a gambling addiction, Addicted to Dimes (Confessions of a Liar and a Cheat) could offer you a lot of identification and motivation, while In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction is a great read for those with less ‘classic addictions’ who find themselves identifying with addicts nonetheless.

What are your top books on addiction recovery, and why?

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3 Responses to “What Are The Best Addiction Recovery Books?”

  1. feelingmywaybackintolife August 20, 2015 at 7:29 pm #

    Nice to add some new titles to my reading list! 🙂 Thank you!

    I quit drinking while reading ‘Kick the drink, easily’ from Jason Vale which I think is a great book: it debunks all the addicty notions I had about booze. Like how I thought it made me happy and social. It made me unsocial and depressed but I was not willing to see that. Which = addiction, obviously but it was good for me to get that spelled out. Most important lesson I learned: be happy that you quit. DO NOT sit around moaning and thinking you are missing out because that WILL NOT WORK. So I did/do practise feeling happy about quitting specifically when I’m a little bit feeble. It is a sort of brainwash, but a much healthier one than the one which said that 2 bottles of wine a day were good for me. :-/

    My second favorite is ‘Addictive Personality’ from Craig Nakken; it describes the character traits from people with addiction, how we (I!) got there and what we (I!) need to learn to get out of the prison called addiction. I was so very surprised, it was like coming home: even though the book was written when I was not even drinking still EVERY SENTENCE felt like written specifically about me and for me. So much insight, so very nice. A must read when you want to get a very thorough but understandable introduction into the what and why of ‘building’ and releasing an addictive character.

    Hope you enjoy!
    xx, Feeling

    • addictionrecoverycoach August 20, 2015 at 7:46 pm #

      Thanks for this. I’d heard of Vale’s book, but Nakken’s is a new one for me. I’ll have to check it out. Thank you so much for sharing and have a fab day 😀 Xx

      • feelingmywaybackintolife August 20, 2015 at 8:15 pm #

        Craig Nakken works with Hazelden, that’s where he turned wise. 🙂

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